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Product Spotlight

Crossbow Buyers Guide

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To be sure you don’t get stuck with a crossbow your unhappy with; you will have to give some thought to which one will suite your needs.

Crossbow Buyers Guide

If you’re new to crossbows, choosing the right one can be a tough decision. There are more makes, models, and sizes available than ever before.  While modern crossbows often look and operate similarly there are some key differences you should take into consideration.

This crossbow buyers guide will outline the most important crossbow factors that you need to consider before making a decision.

Tips & Tricks

Climbing Treestand Tips

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Climbing treestand tips that will help you become a better crossbow hunter.

Climbing Treestand Tips

  1. Go Light –Ditch the backpack and that other gear that isn’t a necessity. It’s much easier to carry a climber in on your back if your not hauling a lot of additional weight. If you still need some gear try to pare down and use something lighter like a fanny pack or fill your pockets.
  2. Seek Cover – Straight, branch less trees lack cover and will not break up your silhouette. So look for a solid climbing tree that is growing in a cluster, near leafy saplings, or surrounded by conifers. Keep in mind that as the seasons change these spots will as well, depending on the type of cover chosen.
  3. Find a Fork – If cover is light, choose a tree that forks 18-20 feet up. This will give you a little more back cover to break up your pattern.
  4. Get Higher – Another trick for low-cover situations is to go higher and further remove yourself from your quarries site line. Keep in mind this added elevation will affect your shooting angle so don’t forget to account for this during shot placement.
  5. Don’t Hang Out – If your climbing stand kicks out from under your feet your harness will catch you. Don’t just leave yourself in a position where you are stuck, make sure you have a controlled decent device.
  6. Clang & Bang – Make sure your climber is strapped together and has padding in appropriate areas to reduce metal on metal sounds that comes from trekking through the woods. Pipe insulation and a little duct tape will go along way. Some climbers have noise reduction technology built in.
  7. Trim Lanes in Advance – You can always go in and climb a tree the day of. But if you can go in early trim your climbing tree and the lanes around it, you’ll ensure nothing will get between you and your trophy.
  8. Know Your Climber – Practice with your climber on different size and species of trees before the season. The exercise will not only help your climbing, but it will allow your to better recognize trees in your area which are perfectly suited for your climber.Climber Treestand Tips

Product Reviews

Excalibur Bulldog 400

Bulldog Crossbow

PROS

  • Power and speed result in flatter trajectory and better penetration
  • Reliable high speed technology
  • Comfortable to shoot
  • Well balanced

CONS

  • Extra power = extra weight
  • Premium price tag
  • Heavy draw weight

Bottom Line

Tips & Tricks

Fruit Stand Hunting

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Hunting near fruit can be action packed if you know to setup.

Fruit is nature’s candy and wild animals can’t resist it. This is why abundant fall fruit like apples are key early season hunting spots. Whether it’s a full blown orchard or lone crab apple tree, you can’t go wrong setting up nearby if you consider these 4 tips:

Find the Fruit: If your not hunting an orchard this maybe easier said than done especially since some fruit may drop earlier than others. Also, sometimes you may find the big game will prefer different types of apples over others for no apparent reason. To figure out their favorites you need to scout the different varieties, looking for lots of tracks, chewed apple bits, and rubs on nearby trees.

Trails: Several trails may lead to the fruit trees you choose to hunt over. Trying following these trails until you find one with largest tracks, rubs, or scrapes. Pick a spot in to setup that will put that you in perfect position to intercept anything moving on the trail toward or away from that fruit tree.

Stay Low:  Most fruit tree aren’t suitable for treestands and often the areas they thrive in lack other nearby timber for a treestand. As an alternative you can setup a ground blind or pit blind within shooting range. Try to hide the blind the best you can by utilizing local brush and cover. Set it up at least a couple days in advance.

Timing: When you go into hunt near fruit try to arrive early afternoon. Big game aren’t heavily pressured during early season and will often stop by fruit tree as a appetizer before they make their way to an agricultural field.Crossbow Hunting Apples

Tips & Tricks

A Deer Nose Knows

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A whitetail deer has legendary sense of that is equally underestimated as it is overestimated.

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Tips & Tricks

Make a Game Trail

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Make a Game Trail & Improve Your Odds

Whether you’re setting up a mineral lick, trail camera our picking a hunt site, we use game trails as one of the primary factors for picking that location. Once located we hunker down, setup our stand, camera or lick and hope we can intercept an animal coming down that trail. This rarely goes perfectly as planned as wild game often use multiple trails in an area or branch on and off a trail.

So how do we get them to go where we need them to go?

You make a trail, that’s how. Of course you still want to locate a well traveled trail in your area in to ensure there will be traffic. However, once that is done you can take steps to increase your odds the animal will head in your direction.

  • Remove fallen limbs or debris that could encourage them to abandon parts the trail.
  • Locate and block other know trails with some type of obstacle that will deter game from those paths.
  • Use elevation to your advantage and create a new trail which is easier to travel.
  • Plant brush or trees that will grow, eventually forcing them in another direction.
  • Create uneven surfaces that will discourage ungulates (hoofed animals) from traveling over them.
  • In thick brush trim out a new path (be sure to leave some cover)

Wild game is never predictable but given the option most animals will more often than not take the path of least resistance. So use your landscape to your advantage to create the irresistible trophy trail.